Meet the team: Medical excellence behind Klinik´s core solution

Photo: Rony, Petteri, Juhani and Ville bring expertise to the team of doctors from their respective areas of specialisation. Photos: Anne Nenonen

Solid medical expertise is the cornerstone of Klinik services. The members of Klinik’s team of doctors teach artificial intelligence how to interpret medical scenarios.

The members of Klinik’s team of doctors do extraordinary work: they solve medical situations and seek ways to do things digitally. Using artificial intelligence to interpret various medical cases is a new way of doing things. This makes Klinik’s team of doctors a formidable unit.

“We are definitely not just a software company. Medicine is an integral part of our daily operations and decision-making”, says Petteri Hirvonen, COO of Klinik and one of its founding members.

The close involvement of doctors in the company also ensures that Klinik is well-informed about healthcare processes. This is useful when the aim is to make workflows more efficient and to establish how nurses and other healthcare professionals use their working time. The valuable feedback and development suggestions received from the ever-increasing number of professional healthcare users can also be effectively used, after being analysed from medical and operational perspectives.

“I have previously, in addition to my other duties, worked as an on-call emergency physician, travelling around Finland to stand in as a replacement. As a doctor, I’ve seen more than 100 healthcare units and an infinite number of different work processes”, says Petteri.

 

A tight-knit team

The practical work of a team of doctors entails continuously improving an application that interprets medical conditions based on machine learning, and producing medical content for Klinik’s solutions. At the same time, the artificial intelligence element is monitored and constantly taught new things. This is to ensure that the company’s solutions have a solid medical foundation.

In addition to Petteri, the team includes doctors who each have their own specialisation areas and strengths. For example, Rony Lindell, who is responsible for general practice, and Ville Salmensuu, an emergency medicine specialist, have both studied computer science and know the challenges and methods related to artificial intelligence. The physiatrist Juhani Määttä, MD, has been with Klinik since the beginning, while odontological expertise is represented by the dentist Matteus Salonen. Experts in other fields, from an extensive network of colleagues, are used as necessary.

 

Meaningful work

Juhani Määttä says that being part of the Klinik team has brought with it a nice community, within which contact is maintained almost on a daily basis, but often virtually, as team members are located in different parts of Finland and also abroad. Team members have been able to absorb new information from their colleagues and their respective skill sets.

Petteri and Juhani feel that the work done by the team of doctors has meaning and influences people’s well-being.

 

Juhani believes that one factor behind Klinik’s success is specifically medical precision and expertise.

“For example, there is a lot of information about various medical conditions available online, but it is a different thing to provide customers with reliable information in an easily understandable form”, Juhani says.

Petteri, too, thinks that the best part of his job is being able to do things that are meaningful to him, and having the daily experience of influencing people’s well-being and contributing to resolving the problems in healthcare, globally.

“Our new international initiatives ensure that Klinik is gaining momentum.”

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